the GTP

Things from Guelph, On., the Internet, and elsewhere.

plumsmoke:

hey pals, i made this thing over this last month! the tape (which is very almost ready) has one long song on the other side, but here’s 6 jams from me to you. 

Woah woah woah.

— 1 week ago with 26 notes

Philip Johnson, New Canaan

— 1 week ago with 1 note

Dia: Beacon

— 1 week ago
xysciences:

Magnetic putty eating a piece of metal. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

Tony eats a piece of candy.

xysciences:

Magnetic putty eating a piece of metal. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

Tony eats a piece of candy.

(Source: xyprogramming)

— 1 month ago with 2373 notes
palaios-ontos-logos:

Duria Antiquior, a more ancient Dorset
Painting by English geologist, Henry De la Beche, in 1830. This was the first pictorial representation of a scene of prehistoric life based on evidence from fossil reconstructions, a genre now known as paleoart. 

palaios-ontos-logos:

Duria Antiquior, a more ancient Dorset

Painting by English geologist, Henry De la Beche, in 1830. This was the first pictorial representation of a scene of prehistoric life based on evidence from fossil reconstructions, a genre now known as paleoart. 

(via science-junkie)

— 1 month ago with 323 notes

Chemainus, BC

— 1 month ago

Such summer. Around southern Ontario.

— 1 month ago

Pointe au Baril

— 1 month ago

#tidepoolbingo

— 2 months ago
theatlantic:

For the First Time, We Have a Detailed Model of the Universe

It is, if you except the powers of human memory, the closest thing we have to a time machine.
Scientists have created the first realistic model of the universe, capable of recreating 13 billion years of cosmic evolution. The simulation is called “Illustris,” and it renders the universe as a cube (350 million light-years on each side) with, its creators say, unprecedented resolution: The virtual universe uses 12 billion 3-D “pixels,” or resolution elements, to create its rendering. And that rendering includes both normal matter and dark matter.
The rendering, importantly, also includes elliptical and spiral galaxies—bodies that, because of numerical inaccuracies and incomplete physical models, we’d been unable to see with such detail in previous simulations of the universe. It also does a better job than previous renderings of modeling the feedback from star formation, supernova explosions, and supermassive black holes.
Read more. [Image: Illustris Collaboration]

theatlantic:

For the First Time, We Have a Detailed Model of the Universe

It is, if you except the powers of human memory, the closest thing we have to a time machine.

Scientists have created the first realistic model of the universe, capable of recreating 13 billion years of cosmic evolution. The simulation is called “Illustris,” and it renders the universe as a cube (350 million light-years on each side) with, its creators say, unprecedented resolution: The virtual universe uses 12 billion 3-D “pixels,” or resolution elements, to create its rendering. And that rendering includes both normal matter and dark matter.

The rendering, importantly, also includes elliptical and spiral galaxies—bodies that, because of numerical inaccuracies and incomplete physical models, we’d been unable to see with such detail in previous simulations of the universe. It also does a better job than previous renderings of modeling the feedback from star formation, supernova explosions, and supermassive black holes.

Read more. [Image: Illustris Collaboration]

— 3 months ago with 786 notes