the GTP

Things from Guelph, On., the Internet, and elsewhere.
science-junkie:

How plankton gets jet lagged
A hormone that governs sleep and jet lag in humans may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The molecule in question, melatonin, is essential to maintain our daily rhythm, and the European scientists have now discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings, published online today in Cell, indicate that melatonin’s role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.[…]
[The researchers] discovered a group of specialised motor neurons that respond to melatonin. Using modern molecular sensors, [they were] able to visualise the activity of these neurons in the larva’s brain, and found that it changes radically from day to night. The night-time production of melatonin drives changes in these neurons’ activity, which in turn cause the larva’s cilia to take long pauses from beating. Thanks to these extended pauses, the larva slowly sinks down. During the day, no melatonin is produced, the cilia pause less, and the larva swims upwards.
“Step by step we can elucidate the evolutionary origin of key functions of our brain. The fascinating picture emerges that human biology finds its roots in some deeply conserved, fundamental aspects of ocean ecology that dominated life on Earth since ancient evolutionary times”
Read more @EMBL

science-junkie:

How plankton gets jet lagged

A hormone that governs sleep and jet lag in humans may also drive the mass migration of plankton in the ocean, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, have found. The molecule in question, melatonin, is essential to maintain our daily rhythm, and the European scientists have now discovered that it governs the nightly migration of a plankton species from the surface to deeper waters. The findings, published online today in Cell, indicate that melatonin’s role in controlling daily rhythms probably evolved early in the history of animals, and hold hints to how our sleep patterns may have evolved.[…]

[The researchers] discovered a group of specialised motor neurons that respond to melatonin. Using modern molecular sensors, [they were] able to visualise the activity of these neurons in the larva’s brain, and found that it changes radically from day to night. The night-time production of melatonin drives changes in these neurons’ activity, which in turn cause the larva’s cilia to take long pauses from beating. Thanks to these extended pauses, the larva slowly sinks down. During the day, no melatonin is produced, the cilia pause less, and the larva swims upwards.

Step by step we can elucidate the evolutionary origin of key functions of our brain. The fascinating picture emerges that human biology finds its roots in some deeply conserved, fundamental aspects of ocean ecology that dominated life on Earth since ancient evolutionary times

Read more @EMBL

— 4 days ago with 375 notes

youmightfindyourself:

Frustrated that desktop 3D printers on offer were unable to produce things at a human scale (large and medium scale functional design objects) Olivier van Herpt developed his own 3D printer. His 1.50m Delta 3D printer is capable of making 80 cm tall 3D printed ceramic objects such as vases and bowls. (via)

— 4 weeks ago with 281 notes

plumsmoke:

hey pals, i made this thing over this last month! the tape (which is very almost ready) has one long song on the other side, but here’s 6 jams from me to you. 

Woah woah woah.

— 1 month ago with 27 notes

Philip Johnson, New Canaan

— 1 month ago with 1 note

Dia: Beacon

— 1 month ago
xysciences:

Magnetic putty eating a piece of metal. 
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

Tony eats a piece of candy.

xysciences:

Magnetic putty eating a piece of metal. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

Tony eats a piece of candy.

(Source: xyprogramming)

— 2 months ago with 2436 notes
palaios-ontos-logos:

Duria Antiquior, a more ancient Dorset
Painting by English geologist, Henry De la Beche, in 1830. This was the first pictorial representation of a scene of prehistoric life based on evidence from fossil reconstructions, a genre now known as paleoart. 

palaios-ontos-logos:

Duria Antiquior, a more ancient Dorset

Painting by English geologist, Henry De la Beche, in 1830. This was the first pictorial representation of a scene of prehistoric life based on evidence from fossil reconstructions, a genre now known as paleoart. 

(via science-junkie)

— 2 months ago with 343 notes

Chemainus, BC

— 2 months ago

Such summer. Around southern Ontario.

— 2 months ago

Pointe au Baril

— 2 months ago